The Creators Project

Meet The Real World Designers Behind The Fictional Video Games Of ‘Her’

While Spike Jonze’s recent film Her imagined many possibilities about the near-future, one of the subtler prophetic aspects of his love story hypothesized the next-frontier of video games, including interactive characters and controller-free consoles. 

The movie’s protagonist, Theodore, could possibly even represent the gamer of tomorrow, and his video games of choice are equally futuristic, even if they are technically design fiction and only exist within the movie itself. 

The first faux-game in the film was actually created by designer David OReilly. It features a foul-mouthed alien child that guides players through holographic tunnels while hilariously insulting the player. The other video game in Her, designed by Kevin Dart, challenges players to be ruthlessly perfect Moms. 

OReilly’s game is physically immersive as well as seamlessly integrated with other tech, including the Samantha OS. As we watch Theodore play, the game feels like a natural extension into an imagined environment. “Perfect Mom” (made at the fake company “Be Perfect”), suggests the gamer profile has expanded to include a much wider and maybe unexpected demographic.

OReilly and Dart are both known to work as directors in the animation world, so it’s no surprise the games have a highly stylized point of view. More than anything, “Alien Child” and “Perfect Mom” together suggest that specialized video games will continue to play an integral role in the future of entertainment.

We emailed OReilly and Dart to find out what it was like to make the faux video games of the future. 

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Spike Jonze’s Reddit AMA Was Internet Gold

Spike Jonze’s Reddit AMA Was Internet Gold

[Premiere] Her: Love In The Modern Age 

Her: Love In The Modern Age, chronicling reactions to Spike Jonze’s Oscar-nominated film, Her. The documentary, directed by Lance Bangs, features stories and reflections from writers, musicians, actors and contemporary culture experts, including Olivia Wilde, James Murphy and Bret Easton Ellis, on the film Her, and their thoughts on love in the modern age.

[WATCH] Her: Love In The Modern Age (Trailer)

Her: Love In The Modern Age, chronicling reactions to Spike Jonze’s Oscar-nominated film, Her. The documentary, directed by Lance Bangs, features stories and reflections from writers, musicians, actors and contemporary culture experts, including Olivia Wilde, James Murphy and Brett Easton Ellis, on the film Her, and their thoughts on love in the modern age.

Watch the trailer above. Full documentary coming soon to The Creators Project. 

Siri is our (and Spike Jonze's) valentine. 

Siri is our (and Spike Jonze's) valentine

Some of our favorite things: Spike Jonze, skateboarding, Girl & Chocolate.

Just when you thought it couldn’t get bigger or better….
The Creators Project in DUMBO: now including Justice, Juan MacLean, jj, Koreless, Art of Flight and many, many more.
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Just when you thought it couldn’t get bigger or better….

The Creators Project in DUMBO: now including Justice, Juan MacLean, jj, Koreless, Art of Flight and many, many more.

RSVP now!

RSVP here. 

RSVP here. 

Meet Spike Jonze!

As you will remember, filmmaker/Creator Spike Jonze released a little movie last year called Where the Wild Things Are, a years-long collaborative process that brought Maurice Sendak’s children’s book of the same name to life. To mark the undertaking, he launched a smart and vigorously curated arts blog called We Love You So. Right out of the gates it did many fine things by way of bringing often-unheralded artists to light. We’re here to say, though, that the blog is still very much alive, still doing very much of the same each and every business day.

As you will remember, filmmaker/Creator Spike Jonze released a little movie last year called Where the Wild Things Are, a years-long collaborative process that brought Maurice Sendak’s children’s book of the same name to life. To mark the undertaking, he launched a smart and vigorously curated arts blog called We Love You So. Right out of the gates it did many fine things by way of bringing often-unheralded artists to light. We’re here to say, though, that the blog is still very much alive, still doing very much of the same each and every business day.